TNBC Awareness Day

Today is Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) Awareness Day. Until late last night, I didn’t know there was such a day – and part of me can’t help but wish there was no need for it.

Honestly…I don’t have any words for this day or this disease. Triple negative means just that…the cancer is negative for the 3 “typical” hormone receptors that usually feed breast cancer – estrogen, progesterone and HER2-NEU. As you may know, I was (barely) HER2+ when initially diagnosed as Stage 3, which is why I was treated with a certain standard chemo treatment and why I continued herceptin alone until I was re-diagnosed. 

The name itself – triple negative – basically says something along the lines of, “We have absolutely no idea what is feeding this or how to treat it”. For this reason, it tends to be a significantly more aggressive form of breast cancer that is extremely challenging to treat. This is why, often times, a systemic “bomb” of sorts is thrown at your body in the hopes that it will kill the cancer (usually while also killing other rapidly reproducing  cells, such a hair).

Recently, there has been a significant amount of research being put into TNBC so that it will no longer be an unknown cause.  Genetic testing is extremely important, as I am learning that there are actually multiple types of genetic testing that can be done to distinguish what may be driving my cancer. There are also many clinical trials -quite a few that show promise – directed at TNBC. Some are working on your entire system while others attack certain genes. Immunotherapy is a big one that is basically a hit or miss (as i understand it anyway) but absolutely something worth trying.

I appreciate that there is a day to create awareness around TNBC but like I mentioned, I didn’t even know there was such a thing. I learned it from some of the Stage 4 breast cancer Facebook pages that I follow. That being said, all breast cancer sucks. Regardless of hormone receptor status, it is a constant battle and a regular struggle to get through each day, especially with a sense of normalcy, when dealing with breast cancer. Even when there is a specific hormone that may be driving the cancer, there may also be a gene – or multiple genes – that are also driving it. This can make any cancer extremely aggressive to treat and determine whether or not it’ll react to standard treatment options and for how long. Especially as Stage 4, there will come a point when a treatment will stop working and a new one must be sought out – all while considering quality of life.

And then there’s cases like mine where the cancer morphed along the way and throws everything out of whack! And as I learn more and chat more with others, I am learning that it is not uncommon for cancer to morph – even again. It’s also not uncommon to have different drivers of cancer within you. Perhaps you are triple negative but the cancer in your brain is actually HER2+. This is one reason why a biopsy (and in my opinion Foundation One genetic testing) is so important with each new cancer. Admittedly, I have not had my bones tested. I hear that’s pretty horrible.

Anyway, that’s what I have to say. I have to smile because I started this post with nothing particular in mind, thinking it’d be short and sweet. But as it turns out, I apparently have a bit to say about TNBC.  šŸ˜‰

As always, if you are interested in donating to Stage 4 research – where every single penny goes to just that – you can do so at Metavivor.org. I pray that within my lifetime, I will be able to see this disease turn into something chronic that I have to live with – a long, long life – rather than a terminal one.

I hope you learned a little something about TNBC today. šŸ˜˜ā¤

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